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Safe Boats International 65-Foot Coastal Command Patrol Boat

Safe Boats International, the manufacturer of the Defender-class small boats for the U.S. Coast Guard, released a video showing some of the capabilities of its 65-foot Coastal Command Patrol Boat (CCB). The CCB recently underwent testing by the U.S. Navy after its delivery on Aug. 27, 2013.

Coastal Command Patrol Boat

U.S. Navy sailors assigned to Coastal Riverine Group 1 (CRG-10 and Coastal Riverine Squadron 2 (CRS-2) conduct high-speed maneuvers with the new Safe Boats International-built 65-foot Coastal Command Patrol Boat (CCB) during a training exercise, Sept. 27, 2013. CRG-1 Fleet Introduction Team Reservists provided CCB crew familiarization training to CRS-2 personnel. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Scott

Manufactured at SAFE Boats International’s Large Craft Production Facility (LCPF) at Port Tacoma, Wash., the CCB is an early variant of the 85-foot MKVI Patrol Boat being developed for the Navy. Powered by twin diesel engines and water jets, the CCB is capable of over 35 knots and can maintain cruise speed for up to 24 hours. The design of the CCB features a pilothouse and main deck, with shock-mitigating seating for up to 18 crew members. Along with integrated work stations, the CCB includes a separate galley, head, shower facilities, and engine room. Equipped for crew-served and remotely operated weapons, the CCB also features advanced thermal imaging as well as a hydraulic crane  system.

Coastal Command Patrol Boat

U.S. Navy sailors assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron 2 (CRS-2) fire a remotely operated .50 caliber machine gun during a live-fire exercise aboard a Coastal Command Patrol Boat (CCB), Sept. 27, 2013. The CCB is outfitted to be able to fire both crew-served and remotely operated weapons. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Scott

The CCB is unique in that it can patrol shallow littoral areas as well as deeper, open-water regions. The Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC) is the beneficiary of these expanded capabilities. “The arrival of the Coastal Command Boat marks a critical milestone for the Coastal Riverine Force in which new technologies are expanding our team’s ability to support broader missions and battlespace,” said Capt. Chris Peterschmidt, commander of Coastal Riverine Group 1 (CRG-1). According to Peterschmidt, the CCB is scheduled for continuing outfitting and eventual deployment early this year. “CRG-1 looks forward to leading the way as we man, train, and equip the craft and crew for deployment early next year,” said Peterschmidt.

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