Defense Media Network

U.S. Coast Guard 225th Anniversary: A Legacy of Service

 

 

 

Aug. 4, 2015, marks the 225th anniversary of the U.S. Coast Guard, the oldest continuous marine service of the United States. Formed from and of several other agencies, the service first took its name 100 years ago in January 1915 with the merger of the Revenue Cutter Service, itself founded in 1790 as the Revenue Marine, and the U.S. Life-Saving Service, which had been founded in 1878. In 1939, the Coast Guard absorbed the Lighthouse Service (founded 1789), and in 1946, the Maritime Service, which had roots extending to the Steamboat Inspection Service, formed in 1838. There is no shortage of history and heritage in the Coast Guard.

The CGC Hamilton, the fourth Legend-class national security cutter in the service’s fleet, performs sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico Aug. 13, 2014. As important as new cutters are the people who crew them. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Carlos Vega

The CGC Hamilton, the fourth Legend-class national security cutter in the service’s fleet, performs sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico Aug. 13, 2014. As important as new cutters are the people who crew them. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Carlos Vega

Unique among all other U.S. military branches, the Coast Guard can serve as a de facto fifth armed force during time of war, but is the only one with a law enforcement mission with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters. Twice, during World War I and World War II, the Coast Guard has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy, although today it is part of the Department of Homeland Security.

The maritime, multimission service has a heritage and reputation second to none, and is rightly revered for its record of achievements in search and rescue, marine safety, maritime law enforcement, national defense, and marine resource protection over more than two centuries. Today, the Coast Guard has 11 statutory missions. In addition, it carries out drug interdiction, aids to navigation, defense readiness, migrant interdiction, marine environmental protection, and ice operations responsibilities.

Hurricane-Katrina-rescue

One of more than 33,000 people rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. AP photo/David J. Phillip

Earlier this year, we produced U.S. Coast Guard 225th Anniversary, a special edition of Coast Guard Outlook commemorating the anniversary. Included are historical features on the greatest rescues, iconic aircraft, and legendary cutters of the Coast Guard, as well as an exclusive interview with Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft, a guide to the ships and aircraft of the Coast Guard today, and updates on present-day missions.

Visit this link to purchase your own copy of U.S. Coast Guard 225th Anniversary while supplies last!