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Riverine Well Deck Certification

Add another arrow in the naval expeditionary quiver.  The Navy’s Riverine Command Boat (RCB) and Riverine Patrol Boat (RPB) have successfully docked and undocked with an amphibious ship, and are now “well deck certified,” joining familiar landing craft such as the LCU (Landing Craft Utility) and LCAC (Landing Craft Air Cushion).  Achieving riverine well deck certification adds a significant new capability to the Navy’s versatile amphibious fleet.

“What this proves is that, once and for all, we have the capability with the Riverine Command Boats and Riverine Patrol Boats to bring them on board the well deck of a ship,” said Capt. Christopher Halton, commodore of Riverine Group 1.

Sailors from Riverine Squadrons (RIVRON) 2 and 3 completed the first well deck certification for the Riverine Command Boat (RCB) and Riverine Patrol Boat (RPB) aboard USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) May 31.

The boats can now deploy worldwide aboard an amphibious ship.  They can be dropped off out at sea and proceed up rivers and other inland waters.

Riverine well deck ops aboard Oak Hill

A Riverine command boat from Riverine Squadron (RIVRON) 2 departs the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Oak Hill (LSD 51) after the completion of a Riverine well deck certification. The Riverine Force is a combat-arms force that performs point defense, fire support and interdiction operations along inland waterways to defeat enemies and support coalition forces. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael R. Hinchcliffe

“What this proves is that, once and for all, we have the capability with the Riverine Command Boats and Riverine Patrol Boats to bring them on board the well deck of a ship,” said Capt. Christopher Halton, commodore of Riverine Group 1. “With us being able to sustain operations out of the well deck, it opens up a variety of mission sets for the Riverines, from counter piracy missions to supporting amphibious operations or providing force protection for LCACs (Landing Craft, Air Cushioned) operating back and forth to the beach.”

“We’ve kind of pulled it (Riverine mission) out towards the coastal environment right now to fill Riverine needs and the craft has proven to be capable of doing more than just inshore missions,” said Cmdr. Clay Wilson, commanding officer of RIVRON 2.

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Capt. Edward H. Lundquist, U.S. Navy (Ret.) is a senior-level communications professional with more than...